Our History - 1980's

           The Rev. George Moses and Holly came May 28, 1978.  He served as vicar until June 27, 1982.  These were happy years at St. Barnabas.  Growth in membership continued, the church mortgage was paid off, and there was considerable discussion of how the building could be expanded to meet the needs of the growing church.   Christy and Suzanne were born  during these years.  George and Holly chose to purchase their own home, so the vicarage on Johnson Avenue was sold.  

An Annual Parish Meeting
with The Rev. George Moses,
numerous reports being given,
and burning of the church mortgage.
Bible School
reenactment of
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
by C. S. Lewis

FATHER GEORGE AND HIS DAUGHTERS,

Christy and Suzanne

The Moses family moved to Morgantown in June, 1982,

where he began counseling at the

Morgantown Pastoral Counseling Center.

The Rev. William B. Fulks arrived September 5, 1982.

He remained at St. Barnabas until September, 1990.

Convention 1987
We celebrated with a former vicar,
The Rev. Frank Carr, when he became a Bishop.
Bishop Carr returns for a confirmation.
     We had lots of dinners in those years; some were for social occasions and others were fund raisers for outreach projects.  Annual meetings and bishop visitations almost always included a covered dish dinner.  Lenten studies with soup dinners which were started by Fr. Carr continued.  The men had spaghetti dinners for fund raisers.  The youth group cooked and served the annual Shrove Tuesday pancake dinners.  The youth group had adopted a girl in Chile and used donations from the pancake dinners to help fund this project.  For a few years there was a monthly adult game night that met in homes of parishioners to eat and play games.  Picnics in parishioners' yards or at a lake were enjoyed in the summers.
Easter Vigil

        St. Barnabas became a parish following the Diocesan Convention in 1987.   Regrettably, at the Convention of 1990, St. Barnabas voluntarily sought to revert to mission status.  Attrition of membership by death, transfer, and movement left the church in a position where it was not self-supporting.